Indiana Cavern's Blog A journey of exploration and development in Binkley Cave. 2018-06-18T23:29:11+00:00 https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases Cavern Fall Fest https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2016/10/25/cavern-fall-fest 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>Indiana Caverns hosts Cavern Fall Fest</p> <p>Family fun is in store at Indiana Caverns October 22,23 and 29th and 30th.<br /> Children ages 4-12 can enjoy a wide range of activities above and below ground daily. Special treats will be available along the cave tour for Fall Fest participants including rocks and gems.</p> <p>Above ground games and activities are available all day including an inflatable obstacle course, and the Cavern of the Sabertooth, included in the $15 ticket price for children.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns Is located south of Corydon Indiana. For more information on the Cavern Fall Fest go online: IndianaCaverns.com/cavern-fall-fest or call 812 734 1200.</p> Indiana Caverns gary@indianacaverns.com TravelDew Features Gary Roberson in Article https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2015/09/28/traveldew-features-gary-roberson-in-article 2018-06-18T23:29:11+00:00 <p>Gary is featured in an <a href="http://www.traveldew.com/gary-roberson-ceo-and-developer-of-indiana-caverns/">online article</a>.</p> <p>Here is the main excerpt of the above mentioned article. The original article contains a question and answer session with Gary Roberson on Indiana Caverns.</p> <h1>Gary Roberson – CEO and developer of Indiana Caverns</h1> <p>Gary Roberson crawled into his first cave on his first Boy Scout camping trip as a Tenderfoot scout in 1958. He became an active caver the day he received his driver’s license and began mapping in the Binkley cave system in 1967 while attending Vanderbilt University, where he graduated with a business major.</p> <p>Gary’s first real job was as an investment analyst for Capital Holding in Louisville, which allowed him to continue exploring caves in southern Indiana. He developed Squire Boone Caverns, his first show cave adventure 1971-73, then purchased Marengo Cave with three others in 1973. Roberson left Capital Holding to become manager of Marengo Cave National Landmark in 1974 -a position which he held for 28 years. Gary became a Christian in 1980, which revolutionized his world-view. He sold his half of Marengo Cave in 2001 and returned to working on the Binkley cave survey and looking for a way to develop part of it as a show cave.</p> <p>Roberson began the development of Indiana Caverns in 2012. It opened to the public in 2013 and Gary continues on their as CEO today. Gary has written three books about his explorations in Binkley cave system, its development and geology. He is married to his life and business partner, Laura. They have two grown children. While Gary is reaching the age where he can no longer participate in the long grueling survey trips to the far reaches of the Binkley cave system, he continues to find ways to facilitate and participate actively in the on going project in one of America’s most significant caves.</p> TravelDew gary@indianacaverns.com Ice Age bones to be uncovered by Indiana State Museum https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2014/09/18/ice-age-bones-to-be-uncovered-by-indiana-state-museum 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE<br /> Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014<br /> Contacts: Bruce Williams, 317.234.8214, bwilliams@indianamuseum.org<br /> Carol Groves 812.972.4073, carol@indianacaverns.com<br /> Excavation Site: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1VfW2kjGxfo</p> <p>Indiana Caverns to host public viewing of dig Oct. 2-4<br /> Indiana State Museum researchers to excavate Ice Age bones in southern Indiana cave</p> <p>INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. — Paleontologists at the Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites will conduct a public excavation of Ice Age bones on October 2, 3 and 4 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Indiana Caverns. The site is Indiana’s newest show cave near Corydon, Ind., and a part of the Binkley Cave system, Indiana’s longest cave and 8th longest in the country.</p> <p>This three-day public excavation will allow the general public to watch paleontologists unearth bones buried in the cave for up to 40,000 years. The screening process used to find bones and bone fragments will also be on display in the cave.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns staff will join in the excavation, led by the museum’s senior curator of paleobiology, Ron Richards, along with other members of the museum’s research team.</p> <p>Richards assessed ancient bones discovered at the site in 2012 and determined that the cave is one of the largest and best preserved deposits of Ice Age bones yet discovered in Indiana. “There are probably a dozen or more big cave finds like this in North America and Indiana Caverns bone deposits have tremendous value in the interpretation of the Ice Age in Indiana,” Richards added.</p> <p>The original assessment included only bones preserved on the surface of the cave floor including flat-headed peccary, bison, black bear, fisher, porcupine and even passenger pigeon, as well as owls and snakes.</p> <p>The Indiana State Museum has the largest collection and most extensive exhibits concerning the Ice Age in Indiana. Ice Age paleontology is an institutionally proclaimed area of excellence and research.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns CEO Gary Roberson welcomes the opportunity for visitors of all ages to observe the excavation and research project while they witness ancient remains brought to light after being hidden for thousands of years.</p> <p>According to Roberson, the cave has been forming for close to a million years, while the Ice Age bones may date from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago.</p> <p>For more information on the project and how to attend, please visit IndianaCaverns.com or call the site at 812.734.1200.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $19 for adults and $10 for children ages 4-12. Tickets may be purchased at the Indiana Caverns Visitor Center.</p> <ol> <li># #</li> </ol> <p>The Indiana State Museum is located in White River State Park in the heart of downtown Indianapolis. It is Indiana’s museum for science, art and culture, offering a place where you can celebrate, investigate, remember, learn and take pride in Indiana’s story in the context of the broader world. Even the building is a showcase of the best Indiana has to offer in architecture, materials and sculpture.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns is part of a vast system stretching over 41 miles under the sinkhole plain in southern Indiana. The tour includes walking portions, waterfalls, a boat ride as well as ice age bones. The facility includes a visitor center with interpretive exhibits, karst trail, and gemstone mining, just outside historic Corydon and less than 30 minutes from Louisville KY.</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com Indiana's longest cave system extended https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2014/09/12/indianas-longest-cave-system-extended 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>Corydon Indiana<br /> For immediate release:<br /> Contact: Carol Groves 812 972 0473 or 812 734 1200<br /> carol.groves@gmail.com</p> <p>Explorers push endurance limits to push cave to 40 mile mark</p> <p>Indiana’s longest cave system extended</p> <p>When they emerged from the cave to the darkness of a predawn Indiana cornfield on July 13th, 11 cave explorers knew they had pushed their own endurance limits to propel Corydon Indiana’s Binkley Cave system over the 40 mile mark.</p> <p>Muddy, wet, weary but smiling cavers with the Indiana Speleological Survey (ISS) arrived back on the surface after a 17 plus hour trip which added over 7,700 feet of new passage. Pushing their limits, they also pushed the surveyed length of the cave became 40.65 miles,</p> <p>The group’s objective for their recent trip was to survey enough of the underground river passage found on June 14threach the elite 40-mile mark. While there are a number of US caves between 30 and 40 miles in length, there are only three caves between 40 miles and 100 miles in length. On their previous trip they had turned around in the enormous new river passage that cave explorers described as “chugging off into the darkness”.</p> <p>All of the new survey was in a large “borehole” passage that no human had ever set foot in until now. The new passage was named the “McLain River” in honor of ISS caver, Tim McLain, who died of a heart attack in another part of the cave last year.</p> <p>Cavers followed a booming passage teeming with cavefish and crayfish onward through two large rooms to the rise of the McLain River – a beautiful blue pool. Here the river flows up and out of a water-filled conduit that will require high specialized caving diving to continue exploration in this direction.</p> <p>The weary cavers reported seeing several large side passages that were not explored. In addition, the downstream portion of McLain’s River has barely been entered. Team members all agreed that there is much more cave to be discovered and surveyed in this portion of the Binkley Cave system.</p> <p>Binkley Cave has been growing rapidly since long time ISS caver Gary Roberson published a history of the cave’s<br /> exploration Fifty Years Under the Sinkhole Plain in 2009. At the time of publication, Binkley Cave was just over 22 miles in length. It has almost doubled over the past five years. Major breakthroughs and breathtaking discoveries have come almost one after the other over this five-year span.</p> <p>One of these new discoveries was the Indiana Caverns section found in the fall of 2010. Indiana Caverns, which features ice age bones, a 35-foot waterfall, and an underground boat ride, opened to the public in June 2013 giving non-cavers their first glimpse of the underground cavern hidden below Harrison County’s sinkhole plain while dressed in street clothes.</p> <p>Rand Heazlitt, long time ISS member and part of the Indiana Caverns development team pushed a 1700-foot long water crawl on his first caving trip after completion of the cavern development project to discover the path leading to this vast new section known as the Wild Wild West. With this discovery, the cave broke out into a huge new area of the sinkhole (karst) plain south of Corydon.</p> <p>The discoveries of the past year indicate that over time the Binkley Cave system has the potential to possibly grow to over 100 miles in length and become one the truly great caves of the world. The cave system is currently the longest in Indiana, the 9th longest in the US and the 40th jump up into 8th longest in the world. The cavers said they need only about 200 feet of new survey to place in the US.. That undoubtedly will occur on their next trip.</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com Indiana's longest cave system extended https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2014/07/25/indianas-longest-cave-system-extended 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>Corydon Indiana<br /> For immediate release:<br /> Contact: Carol Groves 812 972 0473 or 812 734 1200<br /> carol.groves@gmail.com</p> <p>Explorers push endurance limits to push cave to 40 mile mark<br /> Indiana’s longest cave system extended</p> <p>When they emerged from the cave to the darkness of a predawn Indiana cornfield on July 13th, 11 cave explorers knew they had pushed their own endurance limits to propel Corydon Indiana’s Binkley Cave system over the 40 mile mark.</p> <p>Muddy, wet, weary but smiling cavers with the Indiana Speleological Survey (ISS) arrived back on the surface after a 17 plus hour trip which added over 7,700 feet of new passage. Pushing their limits, they also pushed the surveyed length of the cave became 40.65 miles,</p> <p>The group’s objective for their recent trip was to survey enough of the underground river passage found on June 14th<br /> reach the elite 40-mile mark. While there are a number of US caves between 30 and 40 miles in length, there are only three caves between 40 miles and 100 miles in length. On their previous trip they had turned around in the enormous new river passage that cave explorers described as “chugging off into the darkness”.</p> <p>All of the new survey was in a large “borehole” passage that no human had ever set foot in until now. The new passage was named the “McLain River” in honor of ISS caver, Tim McLain, who died of a heart attack in another part of the cave last year. Cavers followed a booming passage teeming with cavefish and crayfish onward through two large rooms to the rise of the McLain River – a beautiful blue pool. Here the river flows up and out of a water-filled conduit that will require high specialized caving diving to continue exploration in this direction.</p> <p>The weary cavers reported seeing several large side passages that were not explored. In addition, the downstream portion of McLain’s River has barely been entered. Team members all agreed that there is much more cave to be discovered and surveyed in this portion of the Binkley Cave system.</p> <p>Binkley Cave has been growing rapidly since long time ISS caver Gary Roberson published a history of the cave’s exploration Fifty Years Under the Sinkhole Plain in 2009. At the time of publication, Binkley Cave was just over 22 miles in length. It has almost doubled over the past five years. Major breakthroughs and breathtaking discoveries have come almost one after the other over this five-year span.</p> <p>One of these new discoveries was the Indiana Caverns section found in the fall of 2010. Indiana Caverns, which features ice age bones, a 35-foot waterfall, and an underground boat ride, opened to the public in June 2013 giving non-cavers their first glimpse of the underground cavern hidden below Harrison County’s sinkhole plain while dressed in street clothes.</p> <p>Rand Heazlitt, long time ISS member and part of the Indiana Caverns development team pushed a 1700-foot long water crawl on his first caving trip after completion of the cavern development project to discover the path leading to this vast new section known as the Wild Wild West. With this discovery, the cave broke out into a huge new area of the sinkhole (karst) plain south of Corydon.</p> <p>The discoveries of the past year indicate that over time the Binkley Cave system has the potential to possibly grow to over 100 miles in length and become one the truly great caves of the world. The cave system is currently the longest in Indiana, the 9th longest in the US and the 40th jump up into 8th longest in the world. The cavers said they need only about 200 feet of new survey to place in the US.. That undoubtedly will occur on their next trip.</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com “The Longest Year” relived in new book https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2014/07/25/the-longest-year-relived-in-new-book 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>Release Date: For Immediate Release</p> <p>Contact: Carol Groves Indiana Caverns</p> <p>812 734 1200</p> <p>Corydon IN</p> <p>“The Longest Year” relived in new book</p> <p>When Indiana Caverns opened June 15th, 2013 it was the culmination of a very long year of backbreaking work underground. Although the original plan called for development phase that required less than a year, the grueling project lasted 380 days.</p> <p>Now, less than one year after opening American’s newest show cave in Indiana’s longest cave system, developer Gary Roberson has published a book detailing the process.</p> <p>Roberson was no stranger to the show cave industry when he initiated the project. He developed Squire Boone Caverns while working a full time job in investments from 1971 to 1973, then co owned and operated Marengo Cave for 28 years.</p> <p>For years Roberson had dreamed of developing a section of the Binkley Cave system near Corydon In. In 2012, after visiting a section of cave discovered in 2010, Roberson knew he had found the section of cave he dreamed of sharing with visitors.</p> <p>The 279 page book follows the story of one man’s dream to the reality of the first new show cave in Indiana in 40 years.</p> <p>Reviewer Danny Brass said “It is a tale of obsession, frustration, anger, financial insecurity, physical adversity, hopelessness and emotional despair as seemingly insurmountable obstacles rose to challenge those with the audacity to believe that such a task….could be accomplished by a handful of workers operating on a shoestring budget in a limited window of time.”</p> <p>The new book is available on Amazon as well as from Indiana Caverns online and in the shop.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns is open daily at 9 am and located just 4 miles from Exit 105 off I 64.</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com Indiana cave system now in top tier of American caves https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2013/11/05/indiana-cave-system-now-in-top-tier-of-american-caves 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>For Immediate Release Media Contact: Carol Groves<br /> October 28, 2013 Office: 812 734 1200<br /> Cell: 812 972 0473<br /> Carol@IndianaCaverns.com</p> <p>Indiana cave system now in top tier of American caves<br /> Adventurers discover remarkable new sections in daring underwater crawl</p> <p>Corydon, IN – The latest investigation by a four-person speleological survey team has just added 1,763 feet of a recently discovered section of the Binkley Cave system known as The Wild Wild West. Located in Southern Indiana, the cave system is just west of Louisville, KY. In June 2013, a major section of the cave, known as Indiana Caverns, was opened to the public after an immense cache of significant prehistoric remains were discovered.</p> <p>“For the first time ever, this puts the Binkley Cave system, of which Indiana Caverns is a part, into the top 10 longest caves in the United States,” said the 66-year-old Indiana Caverns developer, Gary Roberson. “The new, established survey length of 38.452 miles means this cave is now the ninth longest in the country. The team explored at least another 1,000 feet of walking virgin cave beyond the official survey, demonstrating that there is much more cave to be mapped,” Robson added.</p> <p>Known regions of the Binkley Cave system have been rapidly growing in length since March of this year, when Miller’s Cave, a long known, but a relatively short cave in length, was connected into the system. This new entrance greatly shortened travel times to the far reaches of the cavern where most of the potential for new discoveries lay.</p> <p>Indiana Speleological Survey (ISS) cavers discovered the major new Wild Wild West section through a 1700-foot long low crawl – much of it through water. During the last 600 feet, cavers were forced to turn their head sideways with one ear in the water just to breathe. Finally, they popped out into the Wild Wild West, discovering a massive new underwater river system. In such difficult conditions, it takes strong cavers at least three hours to travel less than 4,000 feet – less than three-fourths of a mile. The new survey takes the cave under large sandstone-capped ridges, raising cavers’ hopes for drier, more caver-friendly passages above the underground river.</p> <p>“These discoveries have drastically changed our understanding of the cave and its future potential,” Robson said. “It is now certain that the Binkley Cave system is one of the largest in the country and its ultimate length may be much greater than we know now – or ever dreamed.”</p> <p>Beyond the region’s stunning caves and caverns, Corydon visitors are provided with a variety of ways to enjoy Hoosier Hospitality, from nostalgic old-time ice cream parlors to the State Historic Site marking Corydon’s place as Indiana’s first state capital. Downtown Corydon, Constitution Elm, a Civil War battlefield and reenactment and tours of one of the nation’s oldest standing early African American schoolhouses attracts history buffs nationwide. Guests can also enjoy diverse dining and accommodations include a historic B&amp;B, affordable modern hotels and rustic cabins. From live bluegrass music to world class cave systems,</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com Indiana Caverns opens for tours June 15th https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2013/06/04/indiana-caverns-opens-for-tours-june-15th 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>America’s newest show cave to offer a variety of experiences above and below ground</p> <p>CORYDON IN June 4th, 2013 Indiana Caverns opens for tours on Saturday June 15th at 9 am. Discovered in 2010, Indiana Caverns is the first show cave to open in Indiana in 40 years.<br /> Tours include both walking sections and a boat ride as part of the new 80 minute tour. Features of the tour include a 35 foot waterfall, heights and depths, formations and the bones of ice age animals. Indiana Caverns is located 2 miles south of I 64 at Corydon IN.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns is part of the Binkley Cave System, Indiana’s longest cave system at 36+ miles and the 11th longest cave in the United States. The section opening for tours was first discovered by cave explorers in 2010. Development was initiated May 31st, 2012 by a small development team led by two men who also developed Squire Boone Caverns from 1971-1973.</p> <p>The largest room in the cavern was named “Big Bone Mountain” by the initial discovers who assumed bones scattered throughout the room were those of farm livestock such as cows, horses and pigs. Paleontologists immediately recognized the age of the bones on a visit to the room in July 2012. The ice age animal bones include black bear, flat nosed peccary, bison, fisher, owls, snakes, beaver, and many other species, all identified by Indiana State Museum paleontologist Ron Richards from surface surveys in the cavern. These animals entered the cave via a passage that appears to have closed roughly 10,000 years ago at the end of the last ice age and may date back as far as 30,000 years ago. No evidence of humans entering the cave prior to 2010 has been found.</p> <p>The cave also features numerous bear beds or “wallows”, ancient claw marks and a diverse cave life. With 21 species of cave troglobites, the cave system is considered a rare biologic “hot spot” for biodiversity by researchers.</p> <p>Surface facilities include interpretive displays in the lobby and media room, a walking trail that relates karst features to the cave below, picnic area, a gemstone and fossil mining area and a gift shop. Groups including schools and other organized groups may receive reduced rates.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns is located just off SR 135, two miles south of Corydon Indiana. The cavern will be open daily at 9am every day except Thanksgiving and Christmas. For more information visit indianacaverns.com or call (812) 734-1200.</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com Repository of Pleistocene Animal Bones Discovered https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2013/05/06/repository-of-pleistocene-animal-bones-discovered 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>For immediate release<br /> Contact: Carol Groves<br /> (812) 972 0473<br /> Repository of Pleistocene Animal Bones Discovered</p> <p>Bone remains of Ice Age animals were recently discovered in a southern Indiana cave. Initial examination indicates the find may be one of the most significant discoveries of ice age remains in a US cave. The cave where the bones were discovered will open to the public in late May as indiana Caverns.</p> <p>In October 2010, ISS (Indiana Speleological Survey) cave explorers mapped up a nearly vertical slot into a oom that would soon be named “Big Bone Mountain”. At the time, it was a strenuous 10-12 hour cave trip to reach this room. Quickly the cavers noticed there were bones in the room. Photos were sent to Ron Richards, Chief Curator of Science and Technology at the Indiana State Museum in Indianapolis. From the photos, Richards thought it most likely either a bison or a musk ox, but couldn’t be sure.</p> <p>Due to the long trek to reach this section of the cave, they couldn’t get a paleontologist to the site. In May 2011, a somewhat shorter route was found and several more trips were taken to this area. More bones were seen in Big Bone Mountain as the explorers looked for passages in the floor of the room.</p> <p>Finally in early June 2012, the developers of Indiana Caverns drilled a new entrance into Big Bone Mountain, which was only 20 feet below the surface. Ron Richards was now easily able to access the area and came down to do a paleontological survey on July 7, 2012.</p> <p>Richards had been only been in the cave 20 minutes when he realized that Big Bone Mountain was a significant site for Pleistocene animal bones. He recorded “extinct Flat-headed peccary (Platygonus compressus), an ancient pig-like animal. Skulls are exposed at the surface, and the deposit in the room may contain 20- 40 individuals at minimum.” On the cave surface alone are apparently numerous peccar bones as well as black bear, fisher, owl other birds, a bison and even two snakes.</p> <p>Numerous bear beds were found, some with peccary bones in them along the river passage. There are enough bones in the cave to keep several paleontologists excavating for years. There remains much more discover below the surface in the cave mud.</p> <p>No evidence of modern visitation was found, so it is likely that a natural entrance to Big Bone Mountain closed up sometime near the end of the last ice age 12-14,000 years ago. Apparently the entrance area of the cave was used extensively for shelter by herds of peccary for 10, 15, or even 25,000 years prior to the closing of the entrance. There is a major drop off not far inside the new 30” hole drilled into one corner of the big room. Apparently an occasional peccary would lose its footing and fall over the ledge and not be able to get back up. Over centuries, many met a similar fate. Bears, peccary and other animals negotiated the rocks and made it to the lower stream level, where the bear beds are located.</p> <p>It is apparent that Indiana Caverns is significant site for ice age animals. Developers of Indiana Caverns plan to coordinate with paleontologists to make sure the site is protected and available for research.</p> <p>Indiana Caverns is scheduled to open for cave tours in the spring of 2013. For more information on Indiana Caverns visit IndianaCaverns.com or Facebook, which is updated daily development news.</p> Carol Groves gary@indianacaverns.com Indiana Caverns Under Development https://indianacaverns.com/media/press-releases/archives/2012/07/21/indiana-caverns-under-development 2017-03-03T21:44:37+00:00 <p>Here is a press release of sorts that may be of interest to many NSS cavers, who follow Caving News daily. I have attached a couple of photos for your potential use.</p> <p>Gary Roberson<br /> NSS 9364<br /> Developer-Indiana Caverns</p> <p>On May 31st, veteran NSS cavers Gary Roberson, Terry (Dog) Crayden and Rand Heazlitt began developing a small portion of the Binkley Cave system as “Indiana Caverns”. This Gary and Terry’s third venture in the show cave business as they developed Squire Boone Caverns from 1971-73 and both are past part-owners of Marengo Cave National Landmark and both helped to re-develop of that cave which originally opened in 1883, but was not-well developed when they purchased it. Gary was co-owner and CEO for 28 years until selling his interest in 2001.</p> <p>Gary and Terry first began exploration and mapping of the Binkley Cave system back in 1967 and their caving group, the Indiana Speleological Survey (ISS) has been actively working with occasional periods of a low ebb ever since. In February of this year, the ISS now under the leadership of Bloomington caver, Dave Everton, connected Binkley Cave and nearby Blowing Hole Cave to form the 11th longest cave in the US at 34.72 miles of survey. Today the surveyed length stands at 34.94 miles. This important connection was made in the Indiana Caverns portion of the system, which was discovered less than two years ago.</p> <p>The first phase in developing Indiana Caverns involved drilling a 30” hole into the cave to allow for engineering and leveling surveys to be conducted. The developers are currently drilling and blasting a long sloping ramp and tunnel from what will eventually be the basement of the Visitor’s Center into a passage that enters the cavern on a high balcony overlooking a large room known as “Big Bone Mountain. The tour eventually drops into a lower level passage known by the cavers as “Blowing Hole Boulevard” where visitors will be treated to a boat ride on a small underground river.</p> <p>If all goes according to plan, Indiana Caverns will open for tours around April 15, 2013. People interested in following the development of the cavern on a daily basis can do so by searching under” Indiana Caverns” on Facebook and liking us. It is anticipated by a full website will be up by early in August at IndianaCaverns.com.</p> Gary Roberson gary@indianacaverns.com